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VIDEO: Susan Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken’s LA Trip Tips

VIDEO: Susan Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken’s LA Trip Tips


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From seaside haunts to downtown’s Grand Central market, the Border Grill girls dish up their favorite LA eats

Chefs Susan Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken are longtime food icons in Los Angeles. Their Border Grill opened in LA's west side in 1990 and has since expanded to Las Vegas, downtown LA, a roving (and really popular) food truck, and cookbook, Cooking with Too Hot Tamales, which reflects their signature spicy and saucy personalities (in the kitchen and out). Feniger's most recent LA eatery, Street, is an experiment (a successful one) in upgrading street foods from around the world, where dishes like kaya toast, a street food from Singapore, lamb kafta meatballs, and seasonal riffs on sag paneer are absolutely mouthwatering.

So when they came to see us recently, we figured there would be no better duo to ask about LA’s best eats, from the ocean to downtown. They divulge their favorite sandwich from local haunt Bay Cities in Santa Monica, as well as Feniger’s favorite pupusas from downtown LA’s Grand Central Market in the video below.


Chef Susan Feniger's Travel-Inspired Dishes

By David Latt
Susan Feniger, one of Los Angeles' best-known restaurateurs, is always planning her next food trip, as soon as she comes home. Feniger's restaurant Street , which opened in 2009, is inspired by the global street-food scene, but her explorations are as much about experiencing the lives people lead as they are about finding travel-inspired recipes.

Talking about a trip to the Turkish countryside, her eyes brightened as she described going with a friend to meet a farmer he knew. A walk into the fields up from the river led them to a house made of sticks with a cow in front. Inside, the kitchen had a fire pit in the middle of the room.

Sitting on the floor for their meal, Feniger watched with pleasure as the farmer's wife first made tahini by grinding sesame seeds and then baked the tahini into the bread for their midday meal. The bread was delicious, as was the experience.

In her kitchen at Street, Feniger demonstrated one of the popular dishes on the menu, an easy-to-make dish with lots of flavor: Brussels sprouts flavored with goat cheese, apples and hazelnuts, topped with an Italian version of a picada without nuts.

When Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken , her longtime cookbook collaborator and fellow chef, were doing research for the dishes they would serve at their second restaurant, Border Grill, they traveled extensively in Mexico. She quickly discovered that the food she loved was the food cooked by street vendors and in people's home.

As she explained, When you go into people's homes "they're so happy you're there eating their food. People took us into their homes because they wanted us to taste their food. You didn't get that if you go to restaurants. When you are on the street and you are in a culture that doesn't usually see [outsiders], they really like that [you are willing to try their food]."

To Feniger, eating the food prepared by people for their everyday lives is how you see the heart of a country. Over the years she has traveled around the world, pursuing her love of culture and eating.

"When I travel, if I don't see a historical site, I'm ok. The much more rewarding experiences are the ones with people in their kitchens. My memories when I travel are ones with people, not with the monuments."

On a 14-day trip, crisscrossing India from Delhi to Mumbai to Goa to Kerala (her favorite), Feniger ate on the street or in people's homes every day. . When she was in Shanghai she was taken by a local on a food tour that began at 4 a.m. so she could watch a man make savory fresh soy milk sticky rice doughnuts cooked in a wok. By 8 a.m., he had finished his breakfast service so he cleaned up and left, allowing a shoe repairman to take over the stall.

The menu at Street cherry-picks taste treats she ate during her travels over several decades.

Recently, Feniger revamped the Street menu and gently moved in the direction of vegetarianism, not for policy reasons but because the street food she loves tends to feature produce over animal products.

Hence, the Brussels sprouts dish. Her picada is Italian and illustrates Feniger's belief that keeping it simple is best. Take a run at flavor, she suggests, letting the ingredients lead you and everyone will be happy.

Brussels Sprouts with Goat Cheese, Apples and Hazelnuts

Cooked quickly, the Brussels sprouts should be crunchy so the dish tastes fresh and inviting. The contrast of savory Brussels sprouts, sweet apples and tart-creamy goat cheese, together with accents of the picada make the dish delicious on its own or as a side dish with a protein such as sautéed tofu, fried chicken, grilled steak or baked salmon.


Chef Susan Feniger's Travel-Inspired Dishes

By David Latt
Susan Feniger, one of Los Angeles' best-known restaurateurs, is always planning her next food trip, as soon as she comes home. Feniger's restaurant Street , which opened in 2009, is inspired by the global street-food scene, but her explorations are as much about experiencing the lives people lead as they are about finding travel-inspired recipes.

Talking about a trip to the Turkish countryside, her eyes brightened as she described going with a friend to meet a farmer he knew. A walk into the fields up from the river led them to a house made of sticks with a cow in front. Inside, the kitchen had a fire pit in the middle of the room.

Sitting on the floor for their meal, Feniger watched with pleasure as the farmer's wife first made tahini by grinding sesame seeds and then baked the tahini into the bread for their midday meal. The bread was delicious, as was the experience.

In her kitchen at Street, Feniger demonstrated one of the popular dishes on the menu, an easy-to-make dish with lots of flavor: Brussels sprouts flavored with goat cheese, apples and hazelnuts, topped with an Italian version of a picada without nuts.

When Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken , her longtime cookbook collaborator and fellow chef, were doing research for the dishes they would serve at their second restaurant, Border Grill, they traveled extensively in Mexico. She quickly discovered that the food she loved was the food cooked by street vendors and in people's home.

As she explained, When you go into people's homes "they're so happy you're there eating their food. People took us into their homes because they wanted us to taste their food. You didn't get that if you go to restaurants. When you are on the street and you are in a culture that doesn't usually see [outsiders], they really like that [you are willing to try their food]."

To Feniger, eating the food prepared by people for their everyday lives is how you see the heart of a country. Over the years she has traveled around the world, pursuing her love of culture and eating.

"When I travel, if I don't see a historical site, I'm ok. The much more rewarding experiences are the ones with people in their kitchens. My memories when I travel are ones with people, not with the monuments."

On a 14-day trip, crisscrossing India from Delhi to Mumbai to Goa to Kerala (her favorite), Feniger ate on the street or in people's homes every day. . When she was in Shanghai she was taken by a local on a food tour that began at 4 a.m. so she could watch a man make savory fresh soy milk sticky rice doughnuts cooked in a wok. By 8 a.m., he had finished his breakfast service so he cleaned up and left, allowing a shoe repairman to take over the stall.

The menu at Street cherry-picks taste treats she ate during her travels over several decades.

Recently, Feniger revamped the Street menu and gently moved in the direction of vegetarianism, not for policy reasons but because the street food she loves tends to feature produce over animal products.

Hence, the Brussels sprouts dish. Her picada is Italian and illustrates Feniger's belief that keeping it simple is best. Take a run at flavor, she suggests, letting the ingredients lead you and everyone will be happy.

Brussels Sprouts with Goat Cheese, Apples and Hazelnuts

Cooked quickly, the Brussels sprouts should be crunchy so the dish tastes fresh and inviting. The contrast of savory Brussels sprouts, sweet apples and tart-creamy goat cheese, together with accents of the picada make the dish delicious on its own or as a side dish with a protein such as sautéed tofu, fried chicken, grilled steak or baked salmon.


Chef Susan Feniger's Travel-Inspired Dishes

By David Latt
Susan Feniger, one of Los Angeles' best-known restaurateurs, is always planning her next food trip, as soon as she comes home. Feniger's restaurant Street , which opened in 2009, is inspired by the global street-food scene, but her explorations are as much about experiencing the lives people lead as they are about finding travel-inspired recipes.

Talking about a trip to the Turkish countryside, her eyes brightened as she described going with a friend to meet a farmer he knew. A walk into the fields up from the river led them to a house made of sticks with a cow in front. Inside, the kitchen had a fire pit in the middle of the room.

Sitting on the floor for their meal, Feniger watched with pleasure as the farmer's wife first made tahini by grinding sesame seeds and then baked the tahini into the bread for their midday meal. The bread was delicious, as was the experience.

In her kitchen at Street, Feniger demonstrated one of the popular dishes on the menu, an easy-to-make dish with lots of flavor: Brussels sprouts flavored with goat cheese, apples and hazelnuts, topped with an Italian version of a picada without nuts.

When Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken , her longtime cookbook collaborator and fellow chef, were doing research for the dishes they would serve at their second restaurant, Border Grill, they traveled extensively in Mexico. She quickly discovered that the food she loved was the food cooked by street vendors and in people's home.

As she explained, When you go into people's homes "they're so happy you're there eating their food. People took us into their homes because they wanted us to taste their food. You didn't get that if you go to restaurants. When you are on the street and you are in a culture that doesn't usually see [outsiders], they really like that [you are willing to try their food]."

To Feniger, eating the food prepared by people for their everyday lives is how you see the heart of a country. Over the years she has traveled around the world, pursuing her love of culture and eating.

"When I travel, if I don't see a historical site, I'm ok. The much more rewarding experiences are the ones with people in their kitchens. My memories when I travel are ones with people, not with the monuments."

On a 14-day trip, crisscrossing India from Delhi to Mumbai to Goa to Kerala (her favorite), Feniger ate on the street or in people's homes every day. . When she was in Shanghai she was taken by a local on a food tour that began at 4 a.m. so she could watch a man make savory fresh soy milk sticky rice doughnuts cooked in a wok. By 8 a.m., he had finished his breakfast service so he cleaned up and left, allowing a shoe repairman to take over the stall.

The menu at Street cherry-picks taste treats she ate during her travels over several decades.

Recently, Feniger revamped the Street menu and gently moved in the direction of vegetarianism, not for policy reasons but because the street food she loves tends to feature produce over animal products.

Hence, the Brussels sprouts dish. Her picada is Italian and illustrates Feniger's belief that keeping it simple is best. Take a run at flavor, she suggests, letting the ingredients lead you and everyone will be happy.

Brussels Sprouts with Goat Cheese, Apples and Hazelnuts

Cooked quickly, the Brussels sprouts should be crunchy so the dish tastes fresh and inviting. The contrast of savory Brussels sprouts, sweet apples and tart-creamy goat cheese, together with accents of the picada make the dish delicious on its own or as a side dish with a protein such as sautéed tofu, fried chicken, grilled steak or baked salmon.


Chef Susan Feniger's Travel-Inspired Dishes

By David Latt
Susan Feniger, one of Los Angeles' best-known restaurateurs, is always planning her next food trip, as soon as she comes home. Feniger's restaurant Street , which opened in 2009, is inspired by the global street-food scene, but her explorations are as much about experiencing the lives people lead as they are about finding travel-inspired recipes.

Talking about a trip to the Turkish countryside, her eyes brightened as she described going with a friend to meet a farmer he knew. A walk into the fields up from the river led them to a house made of sticks with a cow in front. Inside, the kitchen had a fire pit in the middle of the room.

Sitting on the floor for their meal, Feniger watched with pleasure as the farmer's wife first made tahini by grinding sesame seeds and then baked the tahini into the bread for their midday meal. The bread was delicious, as was the experience.

In her kitchen at Street, Feniger demonstrated one of the popular dishes on the menu, an easy-to-make dish with lots of flavor: Brussels sprouts flavored with goat cheese, apples and hazelnuts, topped with an Italian version of a picada without nuts.

When Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken , her longtime cookbook collaborator and fellow chef, were doing research for the dishes they would serve at their second restaurant, Border Grill, they traveled extensively in Mexico. She quickly discovered that the food she loved was the food cooked by street vendors and in people's home.

As she explained, When you go into people's homes "they're so happy you're there eating their food. People took us into their homes because they wanted us to taste their food. You didn't get that if you go to restaurants. When you are on the street and you are in a culture that doesn't usually see [outsiders], they really like that [you are willing to try their food]."

To Feniger, eating the food prepared by people for their everyday lives is how you see the heart of a country. Over the years she has traveled around the world, pursuing her love of culture and eating.

"When I travel, if I don't see a historical site, I'm ok. The much more rewarding experiences are the ones with people in their kitchens. My memories when I travel are ones with people, not with the monuments."

On a 14-day trip, crisscrossing India from Delhi to Mumbai to Goa to Kerala (her favorite), Feniger ate on the street or in people's homes every day. . When she was in Shanghai she was taken by a local on a food tour that began at 4 a.m. so she could watch a man make savory fresh soy milk sticky rice doughnuts cooked in a wok. By 8 a.m., he had finished his breakfast service so he cleaned up and left, allowing a shoe repairman to take over the stall.

The menu at Street cherry-picks taste treats she ate during her travels over several decades.

Recently, Feniger revamped the Street menu and gently moved in the direction of vegetarianism, not for policy reasons but because the street food she loves tends to feature produce over animal products.

Hence, the Brussels sprouts dish. Her picada is Italian and illustrates Feniger's belief that keeping it simple is best. Take a run at flavor, she suggests, letting the ingredients lead you and everyone will be happy.

Brussels Sprouts with Goat Cheese, Apples and Hazelnuts

Cooked quickly, the Brussels sprouts should be crunchy so the dish tastes fresh and inviting. The contrast of savory Brussels sprouts, sweet apples and tart-creamy goat cheese, together with accents of the picada make the dish delicious on its own or as a side dish with a protein such as sautéed tofu, fried chicken, grilled steak or baked salmon.


Chef Susan Feniger's Travel-Inspired Dishes

By David Latt
Susan Feniger, one of Los Angeles' best-known restaurateurs, is always planning her next food trip, as soon as she comes home. Feniger's restaurant Street , which opened in 2009, is inspired by the global street-food scene, but her explorations are as much about experiencing the lives people lead as they are about finding travel-inspired recipes.

Talking about a trip to the Turkish countryside, her eyes brightened as she described going with a friend to meet a farmer he knew. A walk into the fields up from the river led them to a house made of sticks with a cow in front. Inside, the kitchen had a fire pit in the middle of the room.

Sitting on the floor for their meal, Feniger watched with pleasure as the farmer's wife first made tahini by grinding sesame seeds and then baked the tahini into the bread for their midday meal. The bread was delicious, as was the experience.

In her kitchen at Street, Feniger demonstrated one of the popular dishes on the menu, an easy-to-make dish with lots of flavor: Brussels sprouts flavored with goat cheese, apples and hazelnuts, topped with an Italian version of a picada without nuts.

When Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken , her longtime cookbook collaborator and fellow chef, were doing research for the dishes they would serve at their second restaurant, Border Grill, they traveled extensively in Mexico. She quickly discovered that the food she loved was the food cooked by street vendors and in people's home.

As she explained, When you go into people's homes "they're so happy you're there eating their food. People took us into their homes because they wanted us to taste their food. You didn't get that if you go to restaurants. When you are on the street and you are in a culture that doesn't usually see [outsiders], they really like that [you are willing to try their food]."

To Feniger, eating the food prepared by people for their everyday lives is how you see the heart of a country. Over the years she has traveled around the world, pursuing her love of culture and eating.

"When I travel, if I don't see a historical site, I'm ok. The much more rewarding experiences are the ones with people in their kitchens. My memories when I travel are ones with people, not with the monuments."

On a 14-day trip, crisscrossing India from Delhi to Mumbai to Goa to Kerala (her favorite), Feniger ate on the street or in people's homes every day. . When she was in Shanghai she was taken by a local on a food tour that began at 4 a.m. so she could watch a man make savory fresh soy milk sticky rice doughnuts cooked in a wok. By 8 a.m., he had finished his breakfast service so he cleaned up and left, allowing a shoe repairman to take over the stall.

The menu at Street cherry-picks taste treats she ate during her travels over several decades.

Recently, Feniger revamped the Street menu and gently moved in the direction of vegetarianism, not for policy reasons but because the street food she loves tends to feature produce over animal products.

Hence, the Brussels sprouts dish. Her picada is Italian and illustrates Feniger's belief that keeping it simple is best. Take a run at flavor, she suggests, letting the ingredients lead you and everyone will be happy.

Brussels Sprouts with Goat Cheese, Apples and Hazelnuts

Cooked quickly, the Brussels sprouts should be crunchy so the dish tastes fresh and inviting. The contrast of savory Brussels sprouts, sweet apples and tart-creamy goat cheese, together with accents of the picada make the dish delicious on its own or as a side dish with a protein such as sautéed tofu, fried chicken, grilled steak or baked salmon.


Chef Susan Feniger's Travel-Inspired Dishes

By David Latt
Susan Feniger, one of Los Angeles' best-known restaurateurs, is always planning her next food trip, as soon as she comes home. Feniger's restaurant Street , which opened in 2009, is inspired by the global street-food scene, but her explorations are as much about experiencing the lives people lead as they are about finding travel-inspired recipes.

Talking about a trip to the Turkish countryside, her eyes brightened as she described going with a friend to meet a farmer he knew. A walk into the fields up from the river led them to a house made of sticks with a cow in front. Inside, the kitchen had a fire pit in the middle of the room.

Sitting on the floor for their meal, Feniger watched with pleasure as the farmer's wife first made tahini by grinding sesame seeds and then baked the tahini into the bread for their midday meal. The bread was delicious, as was the experience.

In her kitchen at Street, Feniger demonstrated one of the popular dishes on the menu, an easy-to-make dish with lots of flavor: Brussels sprouts flavored with goat cheese, apples and hazelnuts, topped with an Italian version of a picada without nuts.

When Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken , her longtime cookbook collaborator and fellow chef, were doing research for the dishes they would serve at their second restaurant, Border Grill, they traveled extensively in Mexico. She quickly discovered that the food she loved was the food cooked by street vendors and in people's home.

As she explained, When you go into people's homes "they're so happy you're there eating their food. People took us into their homes because they wanted us to taste their food. You didn't get that if you go to restaurants. When you are on the street and you are in a culture that doesn't usually see [outsiders], they really like that [you are willing to try their food]."

To Feniger, eating the food prepared by people for their everyday lives is how you see the heart of a country. Over the years she has traveled around the world, pursuing her love of culture and eating.

"When I travel, if I don't see a historical site, I'm ok. The much more rewarding experiences are the ones with people in their kitchens. My memories when I travel are ones with people, not with the monuments."

On a 14-day trip, crisscrossing India from Delhi to Mumbai to Goa to Kerala (her favorite), Feniger ate on the street or in people's homes every day. . When she was in Shanghai she was taken by a local on a food tour that began at 4 a.m. so she could watch a man make savory fresh soy milk sticky rice doughnuts cooked in a wok. By 8 a.m., he had finished his breakfast service so he cleaned up and left, allowing a shoe repairman to take over the stall.

The menu at Street cherry-picks taste treats she ate during her travels over several decades.

Recently, Feniger revamped the Street menu and gently moved in the direction of vegetarianism, not for policy reasons but because the street food she loves tends to feature produce over animal products.

Hence, the Brussels sprouts dish. Her picada is Italian and illustrates Feniger's belief that keeping it simple is best. Take a run at flavor, she suggests, letting the ingredients lead you and everyone will be happy.

Brussels Sprouts with Goat Cheese, Apples and Hazelnuts

Cooked quickly, the Brussels sprouts should be crunchy so the dish tastes fresh and inviting. The contrast of savory Brussels sprouts, sweet apples and tart-creamy goat cheese, together with accents of the picada make the dish delicious on its own or as a side dish with a protein such as sautéed tofu, fried chicken, grilled steak or baked salmon.


Chef Susan Feniger's Travel-Inspired Dishes

By David Latt
Susan Feniger, one of Los Angeles' best-known restaurateurs, is always planning her next food trip, as soon as she comes home. Feniger's restaurant Street , which opened in 2009, is inspired by the global street-food scene, but her explorations are as much about experiencing the lives people lead as they are about finding travel-inspired recipes.

Talking about a trip to the Turkish countryside, her eyes brightened as she described going with a friend to meet a farmer he knew. A walk into the fields up from the river led them to a house made of sticks with a cow in front. Inside, the kitchen had a fire pit in the middle of the room.

Sitting on the floor for their meal, Feniger watched with pleasure as the farmer's wife first made tahini by grinding sesame seeds and then baked the tahini into the bread for their midday meal. The bread was delicious, as was the experience.

In her kitchen at Street, Feniger demonstrated one of the popular dishes on the menu, an easy-to-make dish with lots of flavor: Brussels sprouts flavored with goat cheese, apples and hazelnuts, topped with an Italian version of a picada without nuts.

When Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken , her longtime cookbook collaborator and fellow chef, were doing research for the dishes they would serve at their second restaurant, Border Grill, they traveled extensively in Mexico. She quickly discovered that the food she loved was the food cooked by street vendors and in people's home.

As she explained, When you go into people's homes "they're so happy you're there eating their food. People took us into their homes because they wanted us to taste their food. You didn't get that if you go to restaurants. When you are on the street and you are in a culture that doesn't usually see [outsiders], they really like that [you are willing to try their food]."

To Feniger, eating the food prepared by people for their everyday lives is how you see the heart of a country. Over the years she has traveled around the world, pursuing her love of culture and eating.

"When I travel, if I don't see a historical site, I'm ok. The much more rewarding experiences are the ones with people in their kitchens. My memories when I travel are ones with people, not with the monuments."

On a 14-day trip, crisscrossing India from Delhi to Mumbai to Goa to Kerala (her favorite), Feniger ate on the street or in people's homes every day. . When she was in Shanghai she was taken by a local on a food tour that began at 4 a.m. so she could watch a man make savory fresh soy milk sticky rice doughnuts cooked in a wok. By 8 a.m., he had finished his breakfast service so he cleaned up and left, allowing a shoe repairman to take over the stall.

The menu at Street cherry-picks taste treats she ate during her travels over several decades.

Recently, Feniger revamped the Street menu and gently moved in the direction of vegetarianism, not for policy reasons but because the street food she loves tends to feature produce over animal products.

Hence, the Brussels sprouts dish. Her picada is Italian and illustrates Feniger's belief that keeping it simple is best. Take a run at flavor, she suggests, letting the ingredients lead you and everyone will be happy.

Brussels Sprouts with Goat Cheese, Apples and Hazelnuts

Cooked quickly, the Brussels sprouts should be crunchy so the dish tastes fresh and inviting. The contrast of savory Brussels sprouts, sweet apples and tart-creamy goat cheese, together with accents of the picada make the dish delicious on its own or as a side dish with a protein such as sautéed tofu, fried chicken, grilled steak or baked salmon.


Chef Susan Feniger's Travel-Inspired Dishes

By David Latt
Susan Feniger, one of Los Angeles' best-known restaurateurs, is always planning her next food trip, as soon as she comes home. Feniger's restaurant Street , which opened in 2009, is inspired by the global street-food scene, but her explorations are as much about experiencing the lives people lead as they are about finding travel-inspired recipes.

Talking about a trip to the Turkish countryside, her eyes brightened as she described going with a friend to meet a farmer he knew. A walk into the fields up from the river led them to a house made of sticks with a cow in front. Inside, the kitchen had a fire pit in the middle of the room.

Sitting on the floor for their meal, Feniger watched with pleasure as the farmer's wife first made tahini by grinding sesame seeds and then baked the tahini into the bread for their midday meal. The bread was delicious, as was the experience.

In her kitchen at Street, Feniger demonstrated one of the popular dishes on the menu, an easy-to-make dish with lots of flavor: Brussels sprouts flavored with goat cheese, apples and hazelnuts, topped with an Italian version of a picada without nuts.

When Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken , her longtime cookbook collaborator and fellow chef, were doing research for the dishes they would serve at their second restaurant, Border Grill, they traveled extensively in Mexico. She quickly discovered that the food she loved was the food cooked by street vendors and in people's home.

As she explained, When you go into people's homes "they're so happy you're there eating their food. People took us into their homes because they wanted us to taste their food. You didn't get that if you go to restaurants. When you are on the street and you are in a culture that doesn't usually see [outsiders], they really like that [you are willing to try their food]."

To Feniger, eating the food prepared by people for their everyday lives is how you see the heart of a country. Over the years she has traveled around the world, pursuing her love of culture and eating.

"When I travel, if I don't see a historical site, I'm ok. The much more rewarding experiences are the ones with people in their kitchens. My memories when I travel are ones with people, not with the monuments."

On a 14-day trip, crisscrossing India from Delhi to Mumbai to Goa to Kerala (her favorite), Feniger ate on the street or in people's homes every day. . When she was in Shanghai she was taken by a local on a food tour that began at 4 a.m. so she could watch a man make savory fresh soy milk sticky rice doughnuts cooked in a wok. By 8 a.m., he had finished his breakfast service so he cleaned up and left, allowing a shoe repairman to take over the stall.

The menu at Street cherry-picks taste treats she ate during her travels over several decades.

Recently, Feniger revamped the Street menu and gently moved in the direction of vegetarianism, not for policy reasons but because the street food she loves tends to feature produce over animal products.

Hence, the Brussels sprouts dish. Her picada is Italian and illustrates Feniger's belief that keeping it simple is best. Take a run at flavor, she suggests, letting the ingredients lead you and everyone will be happy.

Brussels Sprouts with Goat Cheese, Apples and Hazelnuts

Cooked quickly, the Brussels sprouts should be crunchy so the dish tastes fresh and inviting. The contrast of savory Brussels sprouts, sweet apples and tart-creamy goat cheese, together with accents of the picada make the dish delicious on its own or as a side dish with a protein such as sautéed tofu, fried chicken, grilled steak or baked salmon.


Chef Susan Feniger's Travel-Inspired Dishes

By David Latt
Susan Feniger, one of Los Angeles' best-known restaurateurs, is always planning her next food trip, as soon as she comes home. Feniger's restaurant Street , which opened in 2009, is inspired by the global street-food scene, but her explorations are as much about experiencing the lives people lead as they are about finding travel-inspired recipes.

Talking about a trip to the Turkish countryside, her eyes brightened as she described going with a friend to meet a farmer he knew. A walk into the fields up from the river led them to a house made of sticks with a cow in front. Inside, the kitchen had a fire pit in the middle of the room.

Sitting on the floor for their meal, Feniger watched with pleasure as the farmer's wife first made tahini by grinding sesame seeds and then baked the tahini into the bread for their midday meal. The bread was delicious, as was the experience.

In her kitchen at Street, Feniger demonstrated one of the popular dishes on the menu, an easy-to-make dish with lots of flavor: Brussels sprouts flavored with goat cheese, apples and hazelnuts, topped with an Italian version of a picada without nuts.

When Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken , her longtime cookbook collaborator and fellow chef, were doing research for the dishes they would serve at their second restaurant, Border Grill, they traveled extensively in Mexico. She quickly discovered that the food she loved was the food cooked by street vendors and in people's home.

As she explained, When you go into people's homes "they're so happy you're there eating their food. People took us into their homes because they wanted us to taste their food. You didn't get that if you go to restaurants. When you are on the street and you are in a culture that doesn't usually see [outsiders], they really like that [you are willing to try their food]."

To Feniger, eating the food prepared by people for their everyday lives is how you see the heart of a country. Over the years she has traveled around the world, pursuing her love of culture and eating.

"When I travel, if I don't see a historical site, I'm ok. The much more rewarding experiences are the ones with people in their kitchens. My memories when I travel are ones with people, not with the monuments."

On a 14-day trip, crisscrossing India from Delhi to Mumbai to Goa to Kerala (her favorite), Feniger ate on the street or in people's homes every day. . When she was in Shanghai she was taken by a local on a food tour that began at 4 a.m. so she could watch a man make savory fresh soy milk sticky rice doughnuts cooked in a wok. By 8 a.m., he had finished his breakfast service so he cleaned up and left, allowing a shoe repairman to take over the stall.

The menu at Street cherry-picks taste treats she ate during her travels over several decades.

Recently, Feniger revamped the Street menu and gently moved in the direction of vegetarianism, not for policy reasons but because the street food she loves tends to feature produce over animal products.

Hence, the Brussels sprouts dish. Her picada is Italian and illustrates Feniger's belief that keeping it simple is best. Take a run at flavor, she suggests, letting the ingredients lead you and everyone will be happy.

Brussels Sprouts with Goat Cheese, Apples and Hazelnuts

Cooked quickly, the Brussels sprouts should be crunchy so the dish tastes fresh and inviting. The contrast of savory Brussels sprouts, sweet apples and tart-creamy goat cheese, together with accents of the picada make the dish delicious on its own or as a side dish with a protein such as sautéed tofu, fried chicken, grilled steak or baked salmon.


Chef Susan Feniger's Travel-Inspired Dishes

By David Latt
Susan Feniger, one of Los Angeles' best-known restaurateurs, is always planning her next food trip, as soon as she comes home. Feniger's restaurant Street , which opened in 2009, is inspired by the global street-food scene, but her explorations are as much about experiencing the lives people lead as they are about finding travel-inspired recipes.

Talking about a trip to the Turkish countryside, her eyes brightened as she described going with a friend to meet a farmer he knew. A walk into the fields up from the river led them to a house made of sticks with a cow in front. Inside, the kitchen had a fire pit in the middle of the room.

Sitting on the floor for their meal, Feniger watched with pleasure as the farmer's wife first made tahini by grinding sesame seeds and then baked the tahini into the bread for their midday meal. The bread was delicious, as was the experience.

In her kitchen at Street, Feniger demonstrated one of the popular dishes on the menu, an easy-to-make dish with lots of flavor: Brussels sprouts flavored with goat cheese, apples and hazelnuts, topped with an Italian version of a picada without nuts.

When Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken , her longtime cookbook collaborator and fellow chef, were doing research for the dishes they would serve at their second restaurant, Border Grill, they traveled extensively in Mexico. She quickly discovered that the food she loved was the food cooked by street vendors and in people's home.

As she explained, When you go into people's homes "they're so happy you're there eating their food. People took us into their homes because they wanted us to taste their food. You didn't get that if you go to restaurants. When you are on the street and you are in a culture that doesn't usually see [outsiders], they really like that [you are willing to try their food]."

To Feniger, eating the food prepared by people for their everyday lives is how you see the heart of a country. Over the years she has traveled around the world, pursuing her love of culture and eating.

"When I travel, if I don't see a historical site, I'm ok. The much more rewarding experiences are the ones with people in their kitchens. My memories when I travel are ones with people, not with the monuments."

On a 14-day trip, crisscrossing India from Delhi to Mumbai to Goa to Kerala (her favorite), Feniger ate on the street or in people's homes every day. . When she was in Shanghai she was taken by a local on a food tour that began at 4 a.m. so she could watch a man make savory fresh soy milk sticky rice doughnuts cooked in a wok. By 8 a.m., he had finished his breakfast service so he cleaned up and left, allowing a shoe repairman to take over the stall.

The menu at Street cherry-picks taste treats she ate during her travels over several decades.

Recently, Feniger revamped the Street menu and gently moved in the direction of vegetarianism, not for policy reasons but because the street food she loves tends to feature produce over animal products.

Hence, the Brussels sprouts dish. Her picada is Italian and illustrates Feniger's belief that keeping it simple is best. Take a run at flavor, she suggests, letting the ingredients lead you and everyone will be happy.

Brussels Sprouts with Goat Cheese, Apples and Hazelnuts

Cooked quickly, the Brussels sprouts should be crunchy so the dish tastes fresh and inviting. The contrast of savory Brussels sprouts, sweet apples and tart-creamy goat cheese, together with accents of the picada make the dish delicious on its own or as a side dish with a protein such as sautéed tofu, fried chicken, grilled steak or baked salmon.


Watch the video: Meet Top Chef Masters Mary Sue Milliken u0026 Susan Feniger (July 2022).


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