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Overnight Steak And Ale recipe

Overnight Steak And Ale recipe


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If you’re looking for something you can just throw in a pressure cooker / slow cooker, overnight steak and ale is perfect.It’s lovely comfort food and is as easy as it gets when it comes to cooking.I used some diced steak I found reduced from £3.70 to just £1 at my local Sainsburys, which helps to make this recipe cheap as chips.To cook it I use the Pressure King Pro that PK bought me for Christmas.In all honesty, if I had gone out and bought an electric pressure cooker myself, I would have looked for one cheaper in price.However, there is no denying it is well worth the money, especially for the amount I use it and the amount of meals you can use it for.


Cheshire, England, UK

1 person made this

Ingredients

  • 450g Diced steak
  • 3 carrots
  • 1 onion
  • 2 leeks
  • A box of mushrooms (I used closed cup chestnut mushrooms)
  • 1 cup of beef stock
  • 1 bottle of Guinness
  • 1tsp mustard
  • Half tsp Cayenne pepper

Method

  1. Chop all the veg.
  2. Using a Knorr beef stock pot, make up a cup of beef stock and add it to the pressure cooker / slow cooker.
  3. Add mustard and Cayenne pepper
  4. Add the diced beef (you can add it frozen if using a pressure cooker).
  5. Throw in the chopped veg and then cover the lot with the bottle of Guinness.
  6. Cover the lid and slow cook for 24 hours.
  7. Serve with pastry if you wish and a selection of fresh vegetables

Tip

That is it, it really couldn’t be simpler.By shopping thrifty, using yellow ticket diced steak this cost roughly £1 per head and should feed at least 4.I made this whilst preparing Sunday roast so it was ready for my dinner on the Monday evening, meaning I can just get home from work and chill.If you really wanted, you could pressure cook this in about 40 mins or so rather than slow cook it, I just wanted it ready for when I got home.You may want to reduce times if using different appliances, but I highly recommend these electric pressure cookers.

See it on my blog

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  • 600 grams boneless beef shin
  • 600 grams beef osso bucco, bone-in
  • 200 grams smoked bacon, diced
  • 2 brown onions, diced
  • 2 medium carrots, diced
  • 2 stalks celery, diced
  • 40 grams ap flour
  • 1 liter beef stock
  • 40 grams tomato paste
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 6 to 8 dried shiitake mushrooms
  • 1 teaspoon cocoa powder
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 sprig rosemary
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  • 2 leaves sage
  • 500 milliliters ale, slightly sweet
  • 800 grams frozen puff pastry
  • Butter, for greasing
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • Poppy seeds, optional

Servings 8
Preparation time 40mins
Cooking time 240mins
Adapted from shethinksshecancook.blogspot.com.au


Steak Pie, Hogmanay, the Vikings and Superstitions

Before diving into the steak pie itself, we’re going to first dive into one of the most intriguing holidays of them all: Hogmanay.

Origins of Hogmanay

Whereas the celebration of the New Year is a fairly new tradition (only since

400 years ago) for us in the Western world, the Scots have maintained the ancient tradition of Hogmanay for much longer than that.

There’s an ongoing debate as to where the actual name Hogmanay comes from. Some debate that it comes from the Old Anglo-Saxon words Haleg Monath (Holy Month) while others think it derives from the Gaelic Oge Maidne (New Morning). Yet despite the name quibbles, you’re brought nonetheless back to the one overarching theme of Hogmanay: to ring in the New Year on a positive note.

The tradition traces back to between the 8th or 9th century and the arrival of the Vikings. Like we saw with Finnish joulutortut and Norwegian sandkaker, the Norse had already a longstanding pagan tradition Jul honoring the winter solstice. In other Nordic and Northern European nations, Jul gradually evolved into similar forms of Christmas celebration as Christianity spread throughout the continent.

A Different Evolution

There are two reasons for things transpiring differently in Scotland.

First, the Scottish used the Celtic calendar in pre-Christian times. As opposed to the standard 12-month Gregorian calendar that would come later, the Celtic calendar placed special emphasis on mirroring the Earth’s seasonality and, by extension, the “cycle of life.” At each Quarter Day, the Scots held multi-day celebrations to usher good luck into the new turning season. The wintertime festival in the Celtic calendar was called Samhain, and many of its traditions are still alive as transplants in the Hogmanay celebration.

What really drove Hogmanay into its own unique traditions, though, was the Protestant Reformation. While the 16th century Reformation had a massive impact over the entire continent, the rise of Protestantism had an especially powerful effect on the very pious Scottish nation. Triggered by Henry VIII’s conversion – which took the entire English nation along with him – Scotland quickly decried Catholicism and anything that went along with it.

Between this “Scottish Reformation” and as recent as the 1950s, Christmas was deemed an overly Catholic “Popish” celebration and was outlawed accordingly. While the rest of the world paused and celebrated the Christmas holiday, the Scots carried on with business as usual.

In the 400-year absence of Christmas, Hogmanay took on added meaning to Scottish communities. Almost overnight, Hogmanay merged the celebrations of the winter solstice, Christmas and New Year’s all into one.

While Christmas has returned and is now celebrated again in Scotland, it takes a backseat to the real parties of Hogmanay.

Modern Traditions Around Hogmanay

While some older Hogmanay traditions have died out – like dressing in cattle hides and running around town getting hit with sticks – there are still plenty of rituals that go into the celebration.

One of the most important Hogmanay traditions involves a major house cleaning. The act of “redding the house” ensures the household a fresh, clean start in the New Year. Between redding and “saining,” or blessing, anything in sight (even the water), you’re ready for prosperity in the year ahead.

In line with saining, a properly executed first footing will bring your home luck as well. First footing refers to whomever sets the first foot into your house after the stroke of midnight. If the first foot belongs to a dark-haired male, the household gains good fortune. If not, the household is unfortunately stone out of luck. Those entering the house often bring gifts, which can range from lumps of coal (in a good way) to whiskey to shortbread, for their hosts as well.

There’s plenty of partying going on during Hogmanay too. Fire ceremonies for cleansing and purifying the soul – an original remnant from Viking tradition – remain a key component of Hogmanay today. And of course, there’s more common partying adjoining the fiery fun. The evening of Hogmanay offers up some serious partying well into the wee hours of Ne’erday (New Year’s Day).

Alcohol is a key component for these parties, but so is hearty, delicious food like steak pie.


The Best Makeshift Steak Marinade Recipes—Straight from Pro Chefs

Don’t have time to go shopping? Not a problem. Here's how to improvise.

We've all been there: You've got some steak in the fridge and decide tonight you're going to cook it up. But the steak marinade recipes you've got in your book call for exotic ingredients you've never heard of, or that would require an extra trip to the grocery store. Forget all that. When it comes to creating a terrific marinade, chances are that you've already got all that you need.

"The best part of a marinade is when you are the one creating it out of your very own kitchen ingredients," says Nicole Meyer, cookbook author and founder of Nibbles by Nic. "If that Guinness Stout at the back of your fridge is calling your name, think how downright delicious it would it be doused all over your brisket? Or ketchup, a not-so secretive ingredient. Add a touch of brown sugar and dab of mustard and you've got the best Homemade BBQ Sauce ever."

Meyer speaks from experience—her Meet Mr. Drunken Brisket recipe combines Guinness with ketchup to create something surprisingly delicious. But maybe you're more of a light-beer man, or prefer soft drinks. Whatever your taste, you're likely to find a satisfying and simple marinade recipe below. And for more ways to eat the best possible steak, here is our guide on how to Cook a Steak at Home Like a Pro.

Every self-respecting guy has a bottle of whiskey at his disposal, and this super-simple steak marinade is a great way add an extra kick to the meat.

What You Need

  • 16 ounces skirt or hanger steak
  • 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 cup whiskey (Jack Daniels, Maker's Mark, or Johnny Walker are all solid choices)
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil

Mix liquids together in a bowl. Combine with steak in a Ziplock bag and place in refrigerator for 1 to 3 hours.

When ready to cook, remove steak from fridge. Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high in grill pan. Grill the steak about 5 minutes on each side, until lightly charred on both sides.

Add salt and pepper to taste. Once cooked to your desired doneness, slice and serve.

Another ingredient you're guaranteed to have in your fridge is a bottle of ketchup. This impressively versatile condiment can make for a terrific steak marinade, whether barbecuing or cooking on the stove.

What You Need

  • 16 ounces skirt or hanger steak
  • 1⁄2 cup ketchup
  • 1⁄2 cup water
  • 1⁄4 cup vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1⁄2 cup onion
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 3⁄4 teaspoon salt
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon ground pepper

Mix ketchup, water, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, sugar, and mustard in a bowl. Dice onion finely and add it to the bowl, stirring until completely mixed. Place steaks in a shallow glass cooking dish and pour marinade over the top. Place in refrigerator and marinate for 8 hours (or better yet, overnight).

When ready to cook, remove steaks from fridge. Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high in grill pan. Grill the steak about 5 minutes on each side, until lightly charred on both sides.

While steak is cooking, in a separate small pot, pour the marinade and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until fairly thick. Use reduced marinade as baste for steak or as sauce served on the side.

If you've got a bottle of brown ale or amber in your fridge, this is a great use of it. The nutty and caramel flavors perfectly compliment the meat, combining well with the brown sugar and soy sauce in the recipe.

What You Need

  • 16 ounces skirt or hanger steak
  • 1 cup dark beer
  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 4 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder

In a bowl, combine beer, soy sauce, and brown sugar. Place steaks in a shallow glass cooking dish and pour the marinade over them. Place in refrigerator for 1 to 3 hours.

When ready to cook, preheat grill for high heat.

Remove steaks from marinade. Sprinkle the steak with garlic powder as well as salt and pepper on each side. Pour marinade into saucepan and bring to a boil, cooking for several minutes until liquid has been slightly reduced.

Lightly oil the grill grate. Grill steaks for 5–7 minutes on each side (depending on desired level of doneness). As they finish grilling, baste the steaks with reduced marinade. Slice and serve.

If you're more of a fan of lighter beers, that can work well too. This marinade is a bit more light and spicy with a citrusy undercurrent, and works as well with chicken as well as steak (but for the purposes of this roundup, we're sticking with beef).

What You Need

  • 16 ounces skirt or hanger steak
  • 1 cups Heineken beer
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons minced green onions
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 2 tablespoons Tabasco sauce
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Combine all marinade ingredients into a bowl, stirring until completely mixed. In a shallow glass baking dish or Ziploc bag, combine marinade and steak. Place in refrigerator for 1 to 3 hours.

Remove steaks from marinade. Pour marinade into saucepan and bring to a boil, cooking for several minutes until liquid has been slightly reduced.

Lightly oil the grill grate. Grill steaks for about 5 minutes on each side (depending on desired level of doneness). As they finish grilling, baste the steaks with reduced marinade. Slice and serve.

For those who are partial to soft drinks over whiskey and beer, the fizzy, lemon-lime flavor of 7-Up makes for a surprisingly delicious base for a lighter steak marinade. Ginger and garlic give it a bit more complexity.

What You Need

  • 16 ounces skirt or hanger steak
  • 1 cup 7-up
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated
  • 1 teaspoon garlic, chopped

Mix all steak marinade ingredients in a bowl. Combine with steak in a Ziploc bag or glass baking dish. Place in refrigerator and marinate 1 hour to overnight.

When ready to cook, remove steaks from fridge. Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high in grill pan.

Grill the steak about 5 minutes on each side, until lightly charred on both sides until they are at your preferred level of doneness. Slice and serve.

This recipe comes from Jens Dahlmann, corporate executive chef and vice president of culinary development at LongHorn Steakhouse. Though this is a rub, rather than a marinade, it makes for a great option for those cooking at home who don't have time to run to the store (or one of LongHorn's 480 locations).

What You Need

  • 1/2 cup ground coffee beans
  • 1/2 cup salt
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ancho chili
  • 2 teaspoons black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder

Mix all dry ingredients together, preferably using a whisk. Place into airtight container and store at room temperature.

Generously sprinkle on your steak before placing it on the grill.

Quarter-turn your steak every 2 to 3 minutes to prevent burning or bitterness from the coffee and sugar in the rub.

Here's another super-simple steak marinade recipe with few ingredients but lots of flavor. This uses the taste that's produced by lemon and soy sauce—a citrusy, succulent flavor that will get your mouth watering as it's cooking. It's also versatile, working well with fish and chicken, as well as steak.

What You Need

  • 16 ounces skirt or hanger steak
  • 1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup olive oil

In a bowl, mix all ingredients together and combine with steak in a shallow glass baking dish. Place in the refrigerator and allow to marinate for 1 to 3 hours.

When ready to cook, remove steaks from fridge. Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high in grill pan.

Grill the steak about 5 minutes on each side, until lightly charred on both sides until they are at your preferred level of doneness. Slice and serve.

Alright, yellow mustard is only a small part of this recipe (comprising just about one fifth of the whole marinade), but its flavor gives the meant a big boost. Particularly when combined with Worcestershire sauce and garlic, the simple taste of mustard suddenly turns into something pretty spectacular.

What You Need

  • 16 ounces skirt or hanger steak
  • 1/4 cup yellow mustard
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced

In a bowl, mix all ingredients together and combine with steak in a shallow glass baking dish. Place in the refrigerator and marinate for 2 hours to overnight.

When ready to cook, remove steaks from fridge. Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high in grill pan.

Grill the steak about 5 minutes on each side, until lightly charred on both sides until they are at your preferred level of doneness. Slice and serve.

If you prefer your mustard with a bit more sinus-clearing spice, this is a good marinade you can put together without needing to buy more ingredients than hat you probably already have around the house. The garlic and onion round out the Dijon flavor nicely, making your steak really taste like something special.

What You Need

  • 16 ounces skirt or hanger steak
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder

Combine mustard, garlic, and onion powder into a bowl, mixing thoroughly. Add in vinegar, soy sauce, olive oil, and Worcestershire sauce. In a Ziploc bag or shallow glass baking dish, place the steaks and pour the marinade over top. Marinate overnight.

When ready to cook, remove steaks from fridge and add olive oil to skillet, turning heat to medium-high. Remove steaks from marinade and cook for 3 to 5 minutes on each side, depending on preferred level of doneness.

Remove from skillet and serve.

There's a good chance that you've got a bottle of Tabasco sauce in your cupboard, and this recipe comes directly from the good folks at the hot sauce company.

What You Need

  • 1 boneless beef top loin steak, about 1 pound
  • 2 teaspoons Tabasco sauce
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon thyme leaves
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice

In a mixing bowl, combine Tabasco sauce, salt, garlic powder, thyme, and allspice. Place steak in a baking dish, using the back of a spoon to cover both sides with the marinade Refrigerate for 1 hour to overnight. at least 1 hour or overnight.

When ready to cook, remove from refrigerator and preheat a grill or broiler.

Place steak on grill or broiler pan and cook 4–5 minutes on each side, until it reaches desired doneness.

Next up, steak lovers, check out our list of The 50 Best Steakhouses in America.


Pro Tips

  • Use pre-cut stewing beef with marbling of fat throughout the meat. This means the meat will be more flavorful and tender.
  • Keep the vegetables chunky, as smaller pieces of veggies will break down into mush during the long cooking process.
  • Use a dark brown ale with a roasty, sweet flavor. I used Yuengling Black and Tan.
  • Cook the stew low and slow. Stewing beef is typically a tough cut and requires a long cooking time to become tender.
  • Let the stew cool before putting the pastry on. Hot stew will melt the butter in the pastry, ruining the delicate layers in the pastry.

In a saucepan add the soy sauce, green onions, garlic and ginger and bring to a simmer. Remove from heat and allow the flavors to infuse for about 15 minutes. Add the brown sugar and stir until dissolved. Pour into a large, non-reactive bowl, add the mustard and stir to combine. Add the ale, stir and allow the marinade to chill completely. Add the tri-tip to the marinade and allow to marinate at least overnight, and as long as 24 hours.

When ready, remove the tri-tip from the marinade and place on a pre-heated grill. Grill over moderate heat, covered, until an insta-read thermometer placed in the thickest part of the meat reaches 125 degrees. Be sure to turn the tri-tip over and around to cook it evenly and to give it a nice grill marked crust all over. Be careful not to burn it by keeping it over direct heat, and try not to leave it uncovered for too long while cooking.

When done, place on a cutting board and allow to rest for at least 10 minutes. Slice thinly against the grain and serve. Enjoy!


Steak and ale pudding

A winter classic! A steak and ale pudding made with suet pastry is often found on pub menus, but now we show you how easy it is to make at home. Use ale or Guinness for a rich, deep flavour for the steak and mushrooms. It may take a while to make but once it's steaming you can leave it alone - it's worth the wait.

Published: March 25, 2015 at 3:05 pm

Ingredients

  • oil
  • onion 1 large, halved and sliced
  • chestnut mushrooms 200g, quartered
  • braising steak 400g, cut into 2cm pieces and trimmed of fat
  • plain flour 1 tbsp, seasoned
  • tomato purée 1 tsp
  • brown ale or Guinness 300ml
  • rosemary 1 sprig, leaves picked and chopped

Suet pastry

Method

Heat a drizzle of oil in a large frying pan and cook the onions and mushrooms until golden, then scoop out. Toss the steak in the seasoned flour and fry until browned (you might need a drop more oil). Add back the onions and mushrooms and add the tomato purée, brown ale and thyme, stirring them together thoroughly. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook for 2 hours before leaving to cool.


Method

For the pie, heat a casserole or a large ovenproof pan over a high heat and add the oil. Once hot, add the steak pieces in batches and fry for 3-4 minutes, or until golden-brown on all sides, stirring regularly. Remove the cooked steak from the dish, transfer to a warm plate and set aside. Repeat the process with the remaining steak pieces, then set aside.

Add the onion, mushrooms, whole shallots and carrots to the emptied casserole and fry for 2-3 minutes, or until just softened.

Add the thyme, bay leaves and tomato purée and stir well to combine.

Add the ale and stir well, scraping any sediment up from the bottom of the casserole using a wooden spoon.

Return the browned steak pieces to the casserole, add the hot stock, stir well and bring the mixture to the boil. Turn down the heat, place a lid on the casserole and cook for 1½ hours, or until the beef is tender and the gravy has thickened.

Once cooked, remove the pie filling from the dish and set aside to cool.

Preheat the oven to 220C/425F/Gas 7.

Place the beef and gravy mixture in a 23cm diameter round ovenproof dish.

Roll out the pastry to 1cm/⅓in thickness and cut the pastry into a circle slightly bigger than the pie dish.

Brush a little water around the rim of the pie dish, then place the pastry over the filling and press the edges to seal the pastry to the dish.

Brush the pie with a little beaten egg, then place the pie in the oven and cook for 20-30 minutes, or until the pastry is pale golden-brown and has risen.

For the mushy peas, in a large bowl soak the peas in three times their volume of water and the bicarbonate of soda. Leave for at least four hours or, if you have the time, overnight.

Drain the peas, rinse under the tap, and place on the stove in a large pan and cover with water. Cover and bring to the boil. Once boiled, reduce the heat and simmer the peas for 1½-2 hours, stirring from time to time.

The peas should be soft and mushy in texture but not too dry. If they are wet, continue cooking over the heat with the lid off to dry out a little. Beat in the butter and season to taste with salt.

To serve, cut a slice of pie and place it on a plate and spoon some mushy peas on the side.


Steak & Ale's Hawaian Chicken Secret Recipe

  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup + 2 T. dry sherry
  • 1 1/2 cup unsweetened pineapple juice
  • 1/4 c. red wine vinegar
  • 1/4 cup + 2 T. sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder

Combine all ingredients and marinate chicken overnight. Remove and grill, saute or bake. Baste with marinade ONLY during the first several minutes of cooking. Top each breast with a slice of munster or provolone cheese and broil just until cheese starts to melt.

3 comment:

seems delicious recipe i'll try it. Thanks for sharing.

I worked for Steak and Ale Restaurants on the East and West Coast. so many wonderful memories! But this chicken recipe is the best!


Allow the stew to come to room temperature but don’t leave it out for more than two hours. Store it in airtight containers in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.

You can freeze this stew for up to 6 months. Simply transfer it to airtight containers or resealable freezer bags and pop them in the freezer. Just allow to thaw overnight in the fridge and warm back up to temperature in the stove when ready to eat. Follow the steps to transfer it to a 9吉 inch casserole dish, top with puff pastry and bake.