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Amazon Will Open a Swanky Pop-Up Bar in Tokyo

Amazon Will Open a Swanky Pop-Up Bar in Tokyo


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Amazon’s Tokyo pop-up bar has sommeliers but no menus

Amazon is opening a swanky new bar in Japan.

Amazon already delivers nearly everything a person could need. The site even sells Girl Scout cookies, and it’s possible to order Starbucks with Alexa. In some cities, Amazon Prime members can even order alcohol to be delivered to their homes in just an hour. People who actually want to leave their house, however, might prefer Amazon’s new alcohol service: A real, brick-and-mortar bar with human servers and everything.

According to Sora News 24, Amazon is opening a new Amazon Bar in Tokyo’s swanky Ginza district on October 20. The bar is a temporary pop-up that will only be open for 10 days, but it will be open to the general public.

The Amazon Bar has a high-end look, and the walls are lined with copious bottles of beer, wine, and spirits. There’s no menu, however. Instead, customers use tablets at a central kiosk to answer questions about their tastes and preferences, then the tablet offers a list of customized recommendations.

The bar is not entirely automated, however. There will be a human sommelier on-hand to recommend wines. Amazon Japan offers online sommelier advice for wine orders via the website.

Cocktails range from $4.50 to $13.50, and the bar will also serve food and wine. The food is made from ingredients available through Amazon’s grocery delivery service, and the first dish is free. Unfortunately, the bar will only be around for 10 days. It will probably be extremely crowded, because a full-service cocktail bar sounds like one of the many products Amazon sells that nobody really needs, but everybody wants anyway.


Drink Company’s Themed Pop-Up Bars Have Permanently Closed in Shaw

Over the last five years, Drink Company has transformed its Shaw pop-up bar into a Christmas wonderland, a cherry blossom garden, Game of Thrones’ Seven Kingdoms, a David Bowie tribute, an e-sports game room, and much more. But DC’s most popular (and longest running) pop-up space has finally ended its run. The bar officially closed on Dec. 31 and will not be replaced by a permanent drinking destination.

“We’re tired. That’s probably the easiest way to say it,” says owner Derek Brown. “In essence, we open a new bar four or five times a year…. At the end of the day, it’s an overwhelming amount of work to do, and I don’t think we can continue to do it.”

Beyond all the work that went in behind the scenes, Brown says it was expensive to run a bar that was essentially closed six months a year and had two people on salary to design and construct ever-more elaborate environments. “It’s not a normal thing that bars do,” Brown says. “It wasn’t struggling per se, but it was in a place where it’s hard to see this being worth it.”

So why not open something more permanent? “I don’t think we had a good idea in mind, to be honest with you. We’ve used all our best ideas the last couple years,” Brown says. Before the pop-ups, Drink Company operated a trio of bars in that location: sherry-focused Mockingbird Hill, whiskey haven Southern Efficiency, and oyster bar Eat the Rich. Looking back, though, Brown says they were never the “perfect fit” for the space. He has no intention of bringing them back there or elsewhere.

Talk of the bar’s demise started circulating after Popville spotted equipment from the Miracle on 7th Street pop-up on the auction site Rasmus. If you’re looking for a memento, though, you’re not likely to find it there. Brown says the coolest stuff has already been hand-picked or disassembled. Mostly, it’s ice machines and bulk glassware for sale.

For now, Brown says he intends to focus on Columbia Room, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary this year, as well as other non-bar related projects.

“I can’t say never but I don’t foresee me opening a new bar any time soon. For a lot of people that’s their goal. They got into it because they want to keep expanding and they want to create a restaurant and bar empire,” Brown says. “We just wanted to do cool shit, and we did it.”

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Drink Company’s Themed Pop-Up Bars Have Permanently Closed in Shaw

Over the last five years, Drink Company has transformed its Shaw pop-up bar into a Christmas wonderland, a cherry blossom garden, Game of Thrones’ Seven Kingdoms, a David Bowie tribute, an e-sports game room, and much more. But DC’s most popular (and longest running) pop-up space has finally ended its run. The bar officially closed on Dec. 31 and will not be replaced by a permanent drinking destination.

“We’re tired. That’s probably the easiest way to say it,” says owner Derek Brown. “In essence, we open a new bar four or five times a year…. At the end of the day, it’s an overwhelming amount of work to do, and I don’t think we can continue to do it.”

Beyond all the work that went in behind the scenes, Brown says it was expensive to run a bar that was essentially closed six months a year and had two people on salary to design and construct ever-more elaborate environments. “It’s not a normal thing that bars do,” Brown says. “It wasn’t struggling per se, but it was in a place where it’s hard to see this being worth it.”

So why not open something more permanent? “I don’t think we had a good idea in mind, to be honest with you. We’ve used all our best ideas the last couple years,” Brown says. Before the pop-ups, Drink Company operated a trio of bars in that location: sherry-focused Mockingbird Hill, whiskey haven Southern Efficiency, and oyster bar Eat the Rich. Looking back, though, Brown says they were never the “perfect fit” for the space. He has no intention of bringing them back there or elsewhere.

Talk of the bar’s demise started circulating after Popville spotted equipment from the Miracle on 7th Street pop-up on the auction site Rasmus. If you’re looking for a memento, though, you’re not likely to find it there. Brown says the coolest stuff has already been hand-picked or disassembled. Mostly, it’s ice machines and bulk glassware for sale.

For now, Brown says he intends to focus on Columbia Room, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary this year, as well as other non-bar related projects.

“I can’t say never but I don’t foresee me opening a new bar any time soon. For a lot of people that’s their goal. They got into it because they want to keep expanding and they want to create a restaurant and bar empire,” Brown says. “We just wanted to do cool shit, and we did it.”

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Drink Company’s Themed Pop-Up Bars Have Permanently Closed in Shaw

Over the last five years, Drink Company has transformed its Shaw pop-up bar into a Christmas wonderland, a cherry blossom garden, Game of Thrones’ Seven Kingdoms, a David Bowie tribute, an e-sports game room, and much more. But DC’s most popular (and longest running) pop-up space has finally ended its run. The bar officially closed on Dec. 31 and will not be replaced by a permanent drinking destination.

“We’re tired. That’s probably the easiest way to say it,” says owner Derek Brown. “In essence, we open a new bar four or five times a year…. At the end of the day, it’s an overwhelming amount of work to do, and I don’t think we can continue to do it.”

Beyond all the work that went in behind the scenes, Brown says it was expensive to run a bar that was essentially closed six months a year and had two people on salary to design and construct ever-more elaborate environments. “It’s not a normal thing that bars do,” Brown says. “It wasn’t struggling per se, but it was in a place where it’s hard to see this being worth it.”

So why not open something more permanent? “I don’t think we had a good idea in mind, to be honest with you. We’ve used all our best ideas the last couple years,” Brown says. Before the pop-ups, Drink Company operated a trio of bars in that location: sherry-focused Mockingbird Hill, whiskey haven Southern Efficiency, and oyster bar Eat the Rich. Looking back, though, Brown says they were never the “perfect fit” for the space. He has no intention of bringing them back there or elsewhere.

Talk of the bar’s demise started circulating after Popville spotted equipment from the Miracle on 7th Street pop-up on the auction site Rasmus. If you’re looking for a memento, though, you’re not likely to find it there. Brown says the coolest stuff has already been hand-picked or disassembled. Mostly, it’s ice machines and bulk glassware for sale.

For now, Brown says he intends to focus on Columbia Room, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary this year, as well as other non-bar related projects.

“I can’t say never but I don’t foresee me opening a new bar any time soon. For a lot of people that’s their goal. They got into it because they want to keep expanding and they want to create a restaurant and bar empire,” Brown says. “We just wanted to do cool shit, and we did it.”

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Drink Company’s Themed Pop-Up Bars Have Permanently Closed in Shaw

Over the last five years, Drink Company has transformed its Shaw pop-up bar into a Christmas wonderland, a cherry blossom garden, Game of Thrones’ Seven Kingdoms, a David Bowie tribute, an e-sports game room, and much more. But DC’s most popular (and longest running) pop-up space has finally ended its run. The bar officially closed on Dec. 31 and will not be replaced by a permanent drinking destination.

“We’re tired. That’s probably the easiest way to say it,” says owner Derek Brown. “In essence, we open a new bar four or five times a year…. At the end of the day, it’s an overwhelming amount of work to do, and I don’t think we can continue to do it.”

Beyond all the work that went in behind the scenes, Brown says it was expensive to run a bar that was essentially closed six months a year and had two people on salary to design and construct ever-more elaborate environments. “It’s not a normal thing that bars do,” Brown says. “It wasn’t struggling per se, but it was in a place where it’s hard to see this being worth it.”

So why not open something more permanent? “I don’t think we had a good idea in mind, to be honest with you. We’ve used all our best ideas the last couple years,” Brown says. Before the pop-ups, Drink Company operated a trio of bars in that location: sherry-focused Mockingbird Hill, whiskey haven Southern Efficiency, and oyster bar Eat the Rich. Looking back, though, Brown says they were never the “perfect fit” for the space. He has no intention of bringing them back there or elsewhere.

Talk of the bar’s demise started circulating after Popville spotted equipment from the Miracle on 7th Street pop-up on the auction site Rasmus. If you’re looking for a memento, though, you’re not likely to find it there. Brown says the coolest stuff has already been hand-picked or disassembled. Mostly, it’s ice machines and bulk glassware for sale.

For now, Brown says he intends to focus on Columbia Room, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary this year, as well as other non-bar related projects.

“I can’t say never but I don’t foresee me opening a new bar any time soon. For a lot of people that’s their goal. They got into it because they want to keep expanding and they want to create a restaurant and bar empire,” Brown says. “We just wanted to do cool shit, and we did it.”

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Drink Company’s Themed Pop-Up Bars Have Permanently Closed in Shaw

Over the last five years, Drink Company has transformed its Shaw pop-up bar into a Christmas wonderland, a cherry blossom garden, Game of Thrones’ Seven Kingdoms, a David Bowie tribute, an e-sports game room, and much more. But DC’s most popular (and longest running) pop-up space has finally ended its run. The bar officially closed on Dec. 31 and will not be replaced by a permanent drinking destination.

“We’re tired. That’s probably the easiest way to say it,” says owner Derek Brown. “In essence, we open a new bar four or five times a year…. At the end of the day, it’s an overwhelming amount of work to do, and I don’t think we can continue to do it.”

Beyond all the work that went in behind the scenes, Brown says it was expensive to run a bar that was essentially closed six months a year and had two people on salary to design and construct ever-more elaborate environments. “It’s not a normal thing that bars do,” Brown says. “It wasn’t struggling per se, but it was in a place where it’s hard to see this being worth it.”

So why not open something more permanent? “I don’t think we had a good idea in mind, to be honest with you. We’ve used all our best ideas the last couple years,” Brown says. Before the pop-ups, Drink Company operated a trio of bars in that location: sherry-focused Mockingbird Hill, whiskey haven Southern Efficiency, and oyster bar Eat the Rich. Looking back, though, Brown says they were never the “perfect fit” for the space. He has no intention of bringing them back there or elsewhere.

Talk of the bar’s demise started circulating after Popville spotted equipment from the Miracle on 7th Street pop-up on the auction site Rasmus. If you’re looking for a memento, though, you’re not likely to find it there. Brown says the coolest stuff has already been hand-picked or disassembled. Mostly, it’s ice machines and bulk glassware for sale.

For now, Brown says he intends to focus on Columbia Room, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary this year, as well as other non-bar related projects.

“I can’t say never but I don’t foresee me opening a new bar any time soon. For a lot of people that’s their goal. They got into it because they want to keep expanding and they want to create a restaurant and bar empire,” Brown says. “We just wanted to do cool shit, and we did it.”

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Drink Company’s Themed Pop-Up Bars Have Permanently Closed in Shaw

Over the last five years, Drink Company has transformed its Shaw pop-up bar into a Christmas wonderland, a cherry blossom garden, Game of Thrones’ Seven Kingdoms, a David Bowie tribute, an e-sports game room, and much more. But DC’s most popular (and longest running) pop-up space has finally ended its run. The bar officially closed on Dec. 31 and will not be replaced by a permanent drinking destination.

“We’re tired. That’s probably the easiest way to say it,” says owner Derek Brown. “In essence, we open a new bar four or five times a year…. At the end of the day, it’s an overwhelming amount of work to do, and I don’t think we can continue to do it.”

Beyond all the work that went in behind the scenes, Brown says it was expensive to run a bar that was essentially closed six months a year and had two people on salary to design and construct ever-more elaborate environments. “It’s not a normal thing that bars do,” Brown says. “It wasn’t struggling per se, but it was in a place where it’s hard to see this being worth it.”

So why not open something more permanent? “I don’t think we had a good idea in mind, to be honest with you. We’ve used all our best ideas the last couple years,” Brown says. Before the pop-ups, Drink Company operated a trio of bars in that location: sherry-focused Mockingbird Hill, whiskey haven Southern Efficiency, and oyster bar Eat the Rich. Looking back, though, Brown says they were never the “perfect fit” for the space. He has no intention of bringing them back there or elsewhere.

Talk of the bar’s demise started circulating after Popville spotted equipment from the Miracle on 7th Street pop-up on the auction site Rasmus. If you’re looking for a memento, though, you’re not likely to find it there. Brown says the coolest stuff has already been hand-picked or disassembled. Mostly, it’s ice machines and bulk glassware for sale.

For now, Brown says he intends to focus on Columbia Room, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary this year, as well as other non-bar related projects.

“I can’t say never but I don’t foresee me opening a new bar any time soon. For a lot of people that’s their goal. They got into it because they want to keep expanding and they want to create a restaurant and bar empire,” Brown says. “We just wanted to do cool shit, and we did it.”

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Drink Company’s Themed Pop-Up Bars Have Permanently Closed in Shaw

Over the last five years, Drink Company has transformed its Shaw pop-up bar into a Christmas wonderland, a cherry blossom garden, Game of Thrones’ Seven Kingdoms, a David Bowie tribute, an e-sports game room, and much more. But DC’s most popular (and longest running) pop-up space has finally ended its run. The bar officially closed on Dec. 31 and will not be replaced by a permanent drinking destination.

“We’re tired. That’s probably the easiest way to say it,” says owner Derek Brown. “In essence, we open a new bar four or five times a year…. At the end of the day, it’s an overwhelming amount of work to do, and I don’t think we can continue to do it.”

Beyond all the work that went in behind the scenes, Brown says it was expensive to run a bar that was essentially closed six months a year and had two people on salary to design and construct ever-more elaborate environments. “It’s not a normal thing that bars do,” Brown says. “It wasn’t struggling per se, but it was in a place where it’s hard to see this being worth it.”

So why not open something more permanent? “I don’t think we had a good idea in mind, to be honest with you. We’ve used all our best ideas the last couple years,” Brown says. Before the pop-ups, Drink Company operated a trio of bars in that location: sherry-focused Mockingbird Hill, whiskey haven Southern Efficiency, and oyster bar Eat the Rich. Looking back, though, Brown says they were never the “perfect fit” for the space. He has no intention of bringing them back there or elsewhere.

Talk of the bar’s demise started circulating after Popville spotted equipment from the Miracle on 7th Street pop-up on the auction site Rasmus. If you’re looking for a memento, though, you’re not likely to find it there. Brown says the coolest stuff has already been hand-picked or disassembled. Mostly, it’s ice machines and bulk glassware for sale.

For now, Brown says he intends to focus on Columbia Room, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary this year, as well as other non-bar related projects.

“I can’t say never but I don’t foresee me opening a new bar any time soon. For a lot of people that’s their goal. They got into it because they want to keep expanding and they want to create a restaurant and bar empire,” Brown says. “We just wanted to do cool shit, and we did it.”

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Drink Company’s Themed Pop-Up Bars Have Permanently Closed in Shaw

Over the last five years, Drink Company has transformed its Shaw pop-up bar into a Christmas wonderland, a cherry blossom garden, Game of Thrones’ Seven Kingdoms, a David Bowie tribute, an e-sports game room, and much more. But DC’s most popular (and longest running) pop-up space has finally ended its run. The bar officially closed on Dec. 31 and will not be replaced by a permanent drinking destination.

“We’re tired. That’s probably the easiest way to say it,” says owner Derek Brown. “In essence, we open a new bar four or five times a year…. At the end of the day, it’s an overwhelming amount of work to do, and I don’t think we can continue to do it.”

Beyond all the work that went in behind the scenes, Brown says it was expensive to run a bar that was essentially closed six months a year and had two people on salary to design and construct ever-more elaborate environments. “It’s not a normal thing that bars do,” Brown says. “It wasn’t struggling per se, but it was in a place where it’s hard to see this being worth it.”

So why not open something more permanent? “I don’t think we had a good idea in mind, to be honest with you. We’ve used all our best ideas the last couple years,” Brown says. Before the pop-ups, Drink Company operated a trio of bars in that location: sherry-focused Mockingbird Hill, whiskey haven Southern Efficiency, and oyster bar Eat the Rich. Looking back, though, Brown says they were never the “perfect fit” for the space. He has no intention of bringing them back there or elsewhere.

Talk of the bar’s demise started circulating after Popville spotted equipment from the Miracle on 7th Street pop-up on the auction site Rasmus. If you’re looking for a memento, though, you’re not likely to find it there. Brown says the coolest stuff has already been hand-picked or disassembled. Mostly, it’s ice machines and bulk glassware for sale.

For now, Brown says he intends to focus on Columbia Room, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary this year, as well as other non-bar related projects.

“I can’t say never but I don’t foresee me opening a new bar any time soon. For a lot of people that’s their goal. They got into it because they want to keep expanding and they want to create a restaurant and bar empire,” Brown says. “We just wanted to do cool shit, and we did it.”

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Drink Company’s Themed Pop-Up Bars Have Permanently Closed in Shaw

Over the last five years, Drink Company has transformed its Shaw pop-up bar into a Christmas wonderland, a cherry blossom garden, Game of Thrones’ Seven Kingdoms, a David Bowie tribute, an e-sports game room, and much more. But DC’s most popular (and longest running) pop-up space has finally ended its run. The bar officially closed on Dec. 31 and will not be replaced by a permanent drinking destination.

“We’re tired. That’s probably the easiest way to say it,” says owner Derek Brown. “In essence, we open a new bar four or five times a year…. At the end of the day, it’s an overwhelming amount of work to do, and I don’t think we can continue to do it.”

Beyond all the work that went in behind the scenes, Brown says it was expensive to run a bar that was essentially closed six months a year and had two people on salary to design and construct ever-more elaborate environments. “It’s not a normal thing that bars do,” Brown says. “It wasn’t struggling per se, but it was in a place where it’s hard to see this being worth it.”

So why not open something more permanent? “I don’t think we had a good idea in mind, to be honest with you. We’ve used all our best ideas the last couple years,” Brown says. Before the pop-ups, Drink Company operated a trio of bars in that location: sherry-focused Mockingbird Hill, whiskey haven Southern Efficiency, and oyster bar Eat the Rich. Looking back, though, Brown says they were never the “perfect fit” for the space. He has no intention of bringing them back there or elsewhere.

Talk of the bar’s demise started circulating after Popville spotted equipment from the Miracle on 7th Street pop-up on the auction site Rasmus. If you’re looking for a memento, though, you’re not likely to find it there. Brown says the coolest stuff has already been hand-picked or disassembled. Mostly, it’s ice machines and bulk glassware for sale.

For now, Brown says he intends to focus on Columbia Room, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary this year, as well as other non-bar related projects.

“I can’t say never but I don’t foresee me opening a new bar any time soon. For a lot of people that’s their goal. They got into it because they want to keep expanding and they want to create a restaurant and bar empire,” Brown says. “We just wanted to do cool shit, and we did it.”

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Drink Company’s Themed Pop-Up Bars Have Permanently Closed in Shaw

Over the last five years, Drink Company has transformed its Shaw pop-up bar into a Christmas wonderland, a cherry blossom garden, Game of Thrones’ Seven Kingdoms, a David Bowie tribute, an e-sports game room, and much more. But DC’s most popular (and longest running) pop-up space has finally ended its run. The bar officially closed on Dec. 31 and will not be replaced by a permanent drinking destination.

“We’re tired. That’s probably the easiest way to say it,” says owner Derek Brown. “In essence, we open a new bar four or five times a year…. At the end of the day, it’s an overwhelming amount of work to do, and I don’t think we can continue to do it.”

Beyond all the work that went in behind the scenes, Brown says it was expensive to run a bar that was essentially closed six months a year and had two people on salary to design and construct ever-more elaborate environments. “It’s not a normal thing that bars do,” Brown says. “It wasn’t struggling per se, but it was in a place where it’s hard to see this being worth it.”

So why not open something more permanent? “I don’t think we had a good idea in mind, to be honest with you. We’ve used all our best ideas the last couple years,” Brown says. Before the pop-ups, Drink Company operated a trio of bars in that location: sherry-focused Mockingbird Hill, whiskey haven Southern Efficiency, and oyster bar Eat the Rich. Looking back, though, Brown says they were never the “perfect fit” for the space. He has no intention of bringing them back there or elsewhere.

Talk of the bar’s demise started circulating after Popville spotted equipment from the Miracle on 7th Street pop-up on the auction site Rasmus. If you’re looking for a memento, though, you’re not likely to find it there. Brown says the coolest stuff has already been hand-picked or disassembled. Mostly, it’s ice machines and bulk glassware for sale.

For now, Brown says he intends to focus on Columbia Room, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary this year, as well as other non-bar related projects.

“I can’t say never but I don’t foresee me opening a new bar any time soon. For a lot of people that’s their goal. They got into it because they want to keep expanding and they want to create a restaurant and bar empire,” Brown says. “We just wanted to do cool shit, and we did it.”

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


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